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In honor of Food Day, Chef Lilly Steirer and I have been talking about some of the great ways to incorporate more nourishing foods into our diets. One of the things she asked me was to comment on some strategies for helping our kids to eat well. Kids, mine included, can be very picky eaters, so here are some of my strategies for helping them to make nutritious choices:

Repetition–Often, just having a healthy option on the table, and asking the kids to eat just a little of it, will pay off over time as they become accustomed to it.

“Deconstructed” meals–One thing that has been helpful for getting my kids to eat well is recognizing that, while the whole meal may not look appealing, the individual components of the meal often are. I often serve “deconstructed” meals. For instance, if you make a chicken curry, you can reserve some of the plain cooked chicken, veggies, and rice and allow the kids to use the sauce as they please.

Healthy alternatives–Have fruits, veggies, nuts, and healthy crackers available when they reach for a snack. At dinner time, make sure there is a protein, a healthy starch such as brown rice, quinoa, or whole grain pasta, and a vegetable available.

Ownership–letting your kids choose from an array of healthy options helps them be more excited about eating. My kids always eat more of their lunches when they make their own or we talk about what they want to eat when I pack it.

Gardening– Gardening has also been a great way to get my kids excited about eating fresh fruits and vegetables because they have seen them from seed to table and they feel a sense of ownership and pride with the produce we have produced.

Good Attitude–If your kids see you being picky about food, they are more likely to be less adventurous.

Moderation–Treat treats like treats, not habits. A small bite of good quality dark chocolate is not the same as an entire Hershey bar. Instead of soaking pancakes in syrup, my kids love a small pool to dip in. Life and eating should be fun, just keep things in check.

BPA: Minimize Exposure to Optimize Reproductive Health

I was recently reading a New York Times article entitled “In Plastics and Cans, a Threat to Women,” (1) which talked about some of the more recent research that has been showing the reproductive effects of Bisphenol A, or BPA. The studies quoted in this article show that BPA restricts development of healthy eggs in animal models. Exposure to BPA at any time of life: in the womb, in childhood, and in adulthood all will have a negative effect on female fertility. In a study conducted on discarded eggs from an IVF clinic, they found “Higher levels of BPA were linked to stunted human oocytes, as well as indications of chromosomal damage.” Higher serum levels of BPA have also been linked to greater risk of miscarriage.(2) Studies have also found BPA to have a negative impact on male reproductive function, most profoundly when exposure occurs in utero. Effects on male fetuses included, among other issues, feminization and testicular atrophe. (3)

Although reproductive problems are only one of the ways in which BPA can affect human health (it has also been associated with diabetes, heart disease, thyroid problems and weight gain), this issue is particularly alarming because of the profound impact it can have on our and our children’s quality of life. Infertility is a huge issue in the United States, and it is important for us to look to the future to protect the reproductive health of our children. The choices we make for our children during pregnancy and in their early years can profoundly influence their overall health and reproductive capability in the future. So how can we minimize exposure to and negative effects from BPA?

BPA is an extremely common compound; 5-6 billion tons are produced annually worldwide. The CDC estimates that 93% of people in this country have detectable levels of BPA in their bloodstream, so most of us are coming into contact with it on a regular basis. It can be found in:
Protective layers of canned food containers
wine vat linings
lining water pipes
plastic food storage containers
epoxy resin based paints
floorings
dental composites and sealants
CDs
automobile parts
baby bottles
plastic dinnerware
eyeglass lenses
toys
thermal receipts
impact resistant safety equipment
Some PVC plastics (4)
A recent study found that people who had extensive contact with BPA-coated receipts (such as grocery store checkers) did not have significant elevation in their blood levels of BPA. (5) So coming into skin contact with BPA is probably of less concern to most of us. For most people, the primary route of entry into the body is by ingesting food that has been in contact with BPA. For this reason, the primary way to avoid BPA exposure is to be conscientious about how your food is stored.

The good news is that many companies have switched to BPA-free plastics for food storage. Most baby bottles, water bottles, and many storage containers produced in the past 2-3 years will now be BPA free. In general, it is a good idea to avoid any food or water containers made of plastic with a number 7 on the bottom. This is not a guarantee that the plastic contains BPA, but it could. Rubbermaid has switched their storage containers to be BPA-free as well. However, even plastics that are BPA-free may contain other less-studied substances that can also influence the function of the endocrine (hormone) systems, so moving towards glass and ceramic storage containers is generally a good idea.

Another way to avoid BPA is to eat more fresh, homemade foods. There are many companies that have started switching the lining of their cans to be BPA-free (here’s a nice list of these companies)(6), but in addition to all the other health promoting reasons it is a good idea to make your food yourself, you will be minimizing the risk of exposure from BPA-lined cans.

While minimizing exposure to BPA is obviously a primary goal, it is clear that most of us will come into contact with it in our daily lives. Assuming that most of us have BPA in our system, the final question is how we can mitigate its effects. While there is less research so far in this area, one thing we know is that at least some of its negative effects result from oxidative damage to cells or DNA. It stands to reason then to look to some of our natural antioxidants to counteract the oxidative effects of BPA. In one in vitro study, oxidative damage to red blood cells was reversed using green tea.(7) Another study showed that the effects of oxidation by BPA were reduced in young women by consumption of wheat sprout juice. (8)

BPA is an extremely common substance: most of us come into contact with it on a daily basis, and almost all of us have it in our bodies. While we must live in our world and not spend our time worrying about every detail, it makes sense to minimize exposure to BPA, especially during pregnancy and childhood. The best way to do this is to focus on eating fresh, home-prepared foods, store our foods in glass and ceramic containers, and eat plant foods that are rich in antioxidants. This will help us to maintain good health and preserve the reproductive health of our children.
1.http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/08/28/in-plastics-and-cans-a-threat-to-women/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_php=true&_type=blogs&ref=health&_r=1
2. Lathi RB1, Liebert CA2, Brookfield KF3, et al. Conjugated bisphenol A in maternal serum in relation to miscarriage risk.Fertil Steril. 2014 Jul;102(1):123-8.
3.Manfo FP1, Jubendradass R, Nantia EA et al. Adverse effects of bisphenol A on male reproductive function.Rev Environ Contam Toxicol. 2014;228:57-82. ,
4. http://www.cdc.gov/biomonitoring/BisphenolA_BiomonitoringSummary.html
5. Porras SP1, Heinälä M2, Santonen T2. Bisphenol A exposure via thermal paper receipts.Toxicol Lett. 2014 Aug 28. pii: S0378-4274(14)01310-1.
6. http://www.inspirationgreen.com/bpa-lined-cans.html
7.Suthar H, Verma RJ, Patel S, Jasrai YT. Green tea potentially ameliorates bisphenol a-induced oxidative stress: an in vitro and in silico study. Biochem Res Int. 2014;2014:259763. Epub 2014 Aug 10.
8.Yi B1, Kasai H, Lee HS, et al.Inhibition by wheat sprout (Triticum aestivum) juice of bisphenol A-induced oxidative stress in young women. Mutat Res. 2011 Sep 18;724(1-2):64-8.

Tomatoes, Lycopene and Prostate Cancer

TomatoI had the opportunity to write an article for this month’s issue of the Natural Medicine Journal about the connection between Lycopene and prevention of Prostate cancer. This is following results of the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute earlier this year. The HPFS is an ongoing study of over 50,000 men who were between the ages of 40 and 75 at the beginning of the study in 1986. After nearly 30 years of following the dietary habits and health status of these men, they have found a distinct protective effect of consumption of foods that are high in lycopene.

Lycopene is a carotenoid, a class of compounds that often give plants a yellow, orange, or red color. The foods that are most common in the Western diet that are highest in lycopene are tomatoes, pink grapefruit, and watermelon. Processed tomato foods such as tomato paste and sauce are particularly high in lycopene because it becomes concentrated. Lycopene has the most potent antioxidant activity of all the carotenoids, and there have been many studies over the past several decades that have demonstrated the ability of lycopene to detoxify, prevent cell damage, and initiate death of cancer cells.

This current study is of particular interest to us because, from a prevention standpoint, it looks at whole foods instead of supplements, and it gives us a long-term look at a large number human subjects rather than animal or in-vitro models. The most significant finding in this study is that “men with the highest (cumulative) intake were half as likely to develop lethal prostate cancer compared with those with the lowest intake”. That is, the men who started eating foods with the highest amount of lycopene earliest in life were least likely to die of prostate cancer.

It is also important to note that these men who fared the best in the study seemed to have better habits overall. Those with the highest lycopene consumption “also consumed less alcohol, coffee and all three types of fats and slightly more fruits, vegetables, and dietary fiber”. Diets rich in fruits and vegetables have also been generally found to be protective against cancers and prostate cancer specifically.

What is the take home message from this study? The best way to take care of your prostate is to eat fruits and vegetables, particularly those high in lycopene, and start early–the impact you will have will be so much more powerful now than making changes once a problem arises.

If you would like to see the full article in the Natural Medicine Journal Click Here

Source: Zu, Ke et al. Dietary Lycopene, Angiogenesis, and Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Study in the Prostate-Specific Antigen Era. Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 2014. 106 (2).

Minimizing Colds and Flu for Athletes

iStock_KidsSoccerCold and flu season is here! This morning when I dropped my kids off at school there were 16 kids missing out of 50 due to illness. Seeing all these spaces on the list made me curious to come home and do some research to see what the scientific literature has found to be the best ways to prevent colds and flu. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, the colder Autumn months are associated with the lungs which provide “defensive energy”; meaning our ability to maintain a good barrier between ourselves and the outside world. Here are some of the best ways that Western science has found to help keep our immune systems and lungs strong as we head into the holidays:

Crowded offices, schoolrooms and homes predispose us to sharing germs; higher humidity in these indoor spaces increases the risk of transmission because sneezed or coughed viral particles more readily enter into water droplets that can be inhaled. What to do? Beyond the obvious regular handwashing and sneezing into your elbow, minimize the use of the humidifier and open doors and windows whenever possible to let in fresh air.

Both the quantity and the quality of sleep play a role in immune function; make sure to get enough hours of sleep and try to minimize disturbances during the night.

Both too much and too little exercise tends to decrease immunity and increase incidence of infection. Consistent, daily, moderate exercise has been shown to prevent colds and flu.

While exercise will boost endorphins and immune function, chronic exposure to cold air during endurance exercise can damage bronchial and lung tissue. While you ski, snowboard, run, or skate in cold weather, wear a balaclava or neck gaiter to help warm the air you are breathing.

If you are doing some significant exercise, the most effective way to support the immune system is to ingest a carbohydrate-rich drink before, during, and after. This helps to moderate blood sugar and minimize the impact on immunity.

Generally keeping blood sugar consistent is also key for maintaining immune health. Minimize consumption of alcohol, white flours, and refined sugars, and eat a significant source of protein at least twice per day.

A couple of my favorite immune-boosting foods are jerusalem artichokes and coconut oil.

Stay Healthy!

Cranberry-Apple Crisp (Gluten Free, Vegan)

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Apple-Cranberry Crisp (Gluten Free, Vegan)
We had some old friends over for dinner the other night to catch up and let the kids run around together.  We had this for dessert and the recipe was requested, so here it is!
Baked fruit desserts are my go-to standby for company because they are simple, easy to make ahead, relatively healthy, and great the next morning with yogurt for breakfast.  This is a gluten free, vegan winter version that utilizes what’s in season now.
(serves 6-8)
Preheat oven to 375 degrees
5 small apples, peeled and cut into chunks
2/3 cup fresh cranberries
2 Tbsp corn starch
2/3 cup maple syrup
1 cup rolled oats
1/2 cup brown rice flour
1/3 cup almond flour
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp vanilla
1/3 cup oil (I used avocado, but any mild oil or butter is fine)
In a medium bowl, mix apples, cranberries, corn starch, and 1/3 cup maple syrup. Transfer to an 8X11 baking dish.  Using the same bowl, mix oats, flours, salt, cinnamon, vanilla, oil, and the other 1/3 cup maple syrup until it forms a crumb texture.  Sprinkle over the fruit, making sure all fruit is covered. Bake 45 minutes to an hour until the fruit bubbles and the topping is brown.

Making the Most of the Garden: Pickled and Fried Green Tomatoes

Fried Green Tomatoes

Fried Green Tomatoes

So, as Lilly mentioned in her last post, we had our first real freeze a couple of weeks ago which means just about everything from the garden had to come in. (In case you’re wondering, I keep the carrots and parsnips in the ground until it freezes hard because they keep better out there than in my fridge). Along with all the greens, indian corn for grinding, popcorn for popping, potatoes, zucchini, peppers, tomatillos and ripe tomatoes, I also ended up with about 15 pounds of green tomatoes.

What to do?  If you’ve read my other posts, you know that I am a tomato obsessive:  these overly nurtured babies started out as seeds last February, so even if they’ve not ripened they will not go to waste.  In past years I’ve stuck them in a paper sack and allowed them to ripen, but this year I decided to celebrate them for who they are.  Green tomatoes have their own nutritional benefits:  They are very high in Vitamins A, C, and pantothenic acid, plus are a great source of potassium.  But let’s be honest, I’m not eating them for their nutritional value, I’m loving them for their own unique deliciousness.

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So, the first ten pounds went into jars.  PIckled tomatoes will have all the same health benefits I mentioned in my post about pickles if you prepare them in a similar way.  My folks have found that they need about twice the salt though so I followed their lead.  Sadly, the season for big, overgrown dillweed with large seed heads has passed here so I had to go with the more demurely plastic packaged baby dill from the grocery store. Otherwise, I stuck with the formula.

Next, fried green tomatoes.  I have always heard about this mystical dish and have tried them from time to time but haven’t ever quite gotten the wow I was imagining, so I decided to improvise a bit. I may have mentioned in the past that my husband is a bit of a breaded food obsessive:  chicken fingers, pork cutlets, fish sticks, mozzarella sticks, zucchini fritters–they are all well loved, so I’ve become fairly well practiced at making gluten free, healthy versions of these crispy delights.  These turned out good enough to share the recipe, with a crispy, flavorful crust and a tangy middle.  mmm.  Can’t wait for next year.

GF Fried Green Tomatoes:

2 large green tomatoes, sliced ⅜ inch thick

2 Tbsp high heat oil, such as safflower

1 egg

½ cup grated parmesan

½ cup almond meal

¼ cup arrowroot starch (potato or even corn would also probably work fine)

½ tsp smoked paprika

½ tsp garlic powder

sea salt

Heat a large cast iron skillet over medium high heat and add enough oil to coat the pan generously.  Scramble the egg in a bowl.  Mix the remaining ingredients except salt into another bowl.  Dip tomato slice into egg, allow to drip, then using your other hand, coat with the parmesan/almond mixture.  Place in pan.  Repeat with all the tomato slices.  Salt the upper side.  When the bottom in nicely browned, flip tomato slices, salt, and brown the other side.  You may need to turn heat down to medium if the pan starts to get too hot.  Eat when hot and crispy out of the pan.

Homemade Tomato Sauce and the Benefits of Lycopene

Homemade Tomato sauce

Homemade Tomato Sauce

It’s tomato harvest time here in my backyard, and as my mom says, we are up to our earballs.  Each year at the beginning of September, I go through the same process of frantically calling upon friends and neighbors to please come with large bowls and take some home to enjoy. I also repeat the same ritual of attempting to make a large pot of sauce so I can preserve some of the garden goodness for the months ahead, but always with mixed results.  This year, however, I decided to stop cutting corners and do it right: I grew more romas than slicers or cherry tomatoes, and went through and blanched, skinned, and seeded the tomatoes before putting them in the pot. I always cringe at the thought of getting rid of so much of each precious tomato, but it yielded a thick sauce free of skins and seeds that is worth sticking in the freezer for a colder month.

Because I love to get the most nutrition possible out of my food, I am always wary of any process that involves taking out a significant portion of the food (like skins and seeds) and then cooking it for many hours, so making sauce seems a bit antithetical to this principle.  However, in this case, this food processing can actually boost the benefit of the food because of a little molecule called lycopene.  Lycopene is a carotenoid, or substance that gives the tomato its red color.  It is also found in other pink fruits such as watermelon, papaya, and guava, but the highest amount in the western diet is found in tomatoes.   

In the body, lycopene acts as a powerful antioxidant, meaning it gives electrons to oxygen or other molecules that are missing an electron.  Without an antioxidant these molecules then “steal” electrons from places like our DNA or cell membranes, causing damage to the tissues.  Lycopene has been shown to be a more effective antioxidant than Vitamin E or beta carotene, and can help to prevent cancer of the liver, lung, prostate, breast, and colon.  In cancer cells, it can arrest cells growth and promote cell death while having no effect on normal cells.  It also has been shown to prevent inflammatory disease of the liver, heart and neurological systems.

Interestingly, there are two ways in which cooking helps boost the benefits of lycopene.  First, by cooking out the water, the lycopene content becomes more concentrated, so you get more of it in each bite.  For instance, in a raw tomato, you may get as little as 8.8 mcg/g of lycopene, whereas in tomato sauce, you may get as much as 131 mcg/g. Powdering and freeze drying tend to decrease the amount of lycopene and makes it very unstable, whereas freezing and heat processing stabilizes the lycopene. Also, there are two molecular forms of lycopene, called trans and cis.  In a raw tomato, lycopene is in the trans form, while heat processing converts the lycopene to a cis form.  The longer the cooking, the more of this conversion takes place.  This cis form is more “bioavailable” to the body, meaning it is easier for it to utilize.

One other important thing to note is that how the tomatoes are grown also makes a difference.  Conventionally grown tomatoes have been found to be lower in many nutrients, including Vitamin C, polyphenols, quercetin, and flavonoids like lycopene.  So looking for tomatoes that have been organically grown or growing your own will yield a sauce richest in this health-promoting substance.  Plus, it will be the best sauce you’ve ever tasted.  

Enjoy!

Tomato sauce from scratch:

This is not a quick recipe, but it is a great way to use the bounty of your garden and you will never get a sauce from a jar that tastes as good as this!

Yield: 3-4 quarts

8 pounds fresh roma tomatoes

½ cup red wine

2 Tbsp olive oil

1 yellow onion, diced

5 garlic cloves, minced

2 stalks of celery, diced

2 tsp dried basil

1 tsp dried oregano

½ tsp black pepper

1 Tbsp kosher salt

1 heel of parmesan (optional)

1 small can tomato paste (optional)

Fill a large pot with water and bring to a boil.  Put the tomatoes in (as many at a time as you can fit) and let them sit 2-3 minutes, until you can see the skin starting to crack on a few of them).  Strain the tomatoes out and put in a large bowl, repeat until all the tomatoes are done.  Empty the pot.  With each tomato. make a small slit in the skin and “pop” the insides out.  Cut this in half and gently squeeze out the seeds.  Place the skinned and seeded tomato in the pot.  Repeat until all the tomatoes are done. Add the rest of the ingredients except the tomato paste to the soup pot. Cover and bring to a simmer over medium high heat. Reduce heat and continue to simmer, about an hour.  At this point, you can take a potato masher and break up the tomatoes a bit more.  Continue to simmer uncovered until the sauce thickens, about 2 hours more. If you want to add some extra lycopene and give the sauce a bit more heft, you can add the tomato paste for the last hour of cooking.  Serve with pasta and homemade meatballs.

Sources:

Hallmann E., Orv Hetil. The influence of organic and conventional cultivation systems on the nutritional value and content of bioactive compounds in selected tomato types.J Sci Food Agric. 2012 Nov;92(14):2840-8. doi: 10.1002/jsfa.5617. Epub 2012 Feb 20.

Györéné KG, Varga A, Lugasi A. A comparison of chemical composition and nutritional value of organically and conventionally grown plant derived foods. 2006 Oct 29;147(43):2081-90.

Shi J, Le Maguer M.   Lycopene in tomatoes: chemical and physical properties affected by food processing. Crit Rev Biotechnol. 2000;20(4):293-334.

Unlu NZ, Bohn T, Francis DM, Nagaraja HN, Clinton SK, Schwartz SJ. Lycopene from heat-induced cis-isomer-rich tomato sauce is more bioavailable than from all-trans-rich tomato sauce in human subjects. Br J Nutr.  2007 Jul;98(1):140-6. Epub 2007 Mar 29.

Trejo-Solís C, Pedraza-Chaverrí J, Torres-Ramos M, Jiménez-Farfán D, Cruz Salgado A, Serrano-García N, Osorio-Rico L, Sotelo  Multiple molecular and cellular mechanisms of action of lycopene in cancer inhibition. J.Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2013;2013:705121. doi: 10.1155/2013/705121. Epub 2013 Jul 21.

Lycopene. Wikipedia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beans and Hormone Health

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There is nothing more fun than returning from a few days away from the garden and finding what has sprouted and ripened in my absence.  This morning, after a weekend away camping, I discovered about 30 pounds of zucchini and a bumper crop of yellow string beans.  I love planting beans and peas in my garden both for the delicious harvest and the nitrogen they give back to the soil.  Let’s talk a bit about their specific health benefits as well:

Just about everyone has become familiar with the controversy surrounding soy and its effect on hormones.  We know that soy contains a class of compounds called isoflavones, which have a phytoestrogenic effect on the body.  Soy and soy products, particularly concentrated soy proteins (frequently found in bars, protein powders, and vegetarian “meat” products), are particularly high in these compounds, and can significantly impact the body’s hormone balance.  Why is this important when we are talking about beans?  While soy is particularly high in isoflavones, all members of the bean or pea family will contain some amount of these compounds.

So, what is a phytoestrogen?  To understand this, we need to know a bit about estrogen.  Estrogen is a hormone–a chemical produced by the body that stimulates a receptor on a cell and tells the cell what to do in a specific way.  Estrogen is a growth stimulator, so it tells your body to change from a kid’s body into a grownup’s body.  During the menstrual cycle, estrogen tells your uterus to grow the lining that will support a pregnancy.  It also helps to maintain the strength and integrity of the bones.  A phytoestrogen is a chemical that comes from outside the body that will stimulate an estrogen receptor. Phytoestrogens are generally not as strong as estrogen, so it stimulates that receptor weakly.  So, for people who have very low estrogen levels a phytoestrogen will help the body feel like it has “more” estrogen, but for those with very high estrogen levels, a phytoestrogen may block those receptors and help the body feel like it has “less” estrogen. Because of this moderating quality of these compounds, it can be useful to help balance hormones for those who are both deficient in or have excess estrogen.

As with many botanical families, the legume family has these isoflavones in common throughout its members.  This means that some amount of these compounds can be found in a wide variety of plants that belong to this family: licorice root, alfalfa, clover, lentils, dried beans, peas, and even those fresh green beans.  It is important to keep in mind that isoflavones are only one class of chemical among many found in these foods.  This phytoestrogenic effect will generally be gentle and will be accompanied by all the other benefits of legumes:  fiber, minerals, protein, starches, and green energy in those beans that are eaten fresh.

Soy does tend to contain isoflavones in higher amounts than other members of the legume family, and they will be particularly concentrated in processed soy protein products and soy extracts.  In this case, there will be a more specific medicinal effect because they are being used in a more drug-like manner.  For people who are concerned about a history of estrogen-dependent cancers, this will be more relevant with soy protein products than with other legumes.  Soy protein can also be inappropriate in large amounts for those who would normally have a very low amount of estrogen in their systems, such as young children and men.

Eating for Skin Health

“You are what you eat”–one of our most familiar platitudes for trying to convince ourselves to put good things into our bodies. However, there is great truth to this statement and nowhere is this more obvious than on our skin. One of the basic premises of Naturopathic Medicine states that if the body has optimum nourishment and is free of obstacles, it will come to a state of ideal health. This is an easy way to think about eating for healthy skin. The basic rules of thumb are as follows:

Obstacles to Avoid:

Any allergens or foods to which you are sensitive. Dairy, gluten, and eggs are common “hidden” culprits that can contribute to skin breakouts. If you are unsure of if you have any sensitivities, blood testing can be helpful to find out.
Refined sugars tend to promote breakouts, as do alcoholic beverages
Fatty meats tend to be pro-inflammatory
Nutrients to Include:

Omega 3 fats such as fish and flax oils decrease inflammation and create healthy skin cell membranes. Eating whole fish and flax are great too!
Fiber from sources such as flax, apples, pears, and psyllium help to move toxins from the digestion and reduce inflammation in the body
Water helps to hydrate the skin and flushes toxins from the body
Bright orange fruits and vegetables are a good source of carotenes which convert to Vitamin A, which is important for making healthy cells
Pumpkin seeds are a great source of zinc, which is also helpful for making healthy skin cells
Happy Eating!

Tangy Quinoa Salad

Inspired by Mary Shaw
Preparation: 15 minutes

1 Cup Quinoa
¼ Cup walnuts
3 Tbsp extra virgin Olive Oil
Zest of 1 lime
Juice from 1 lime
½ tsp sea salt
4 Tbsp chopped fresh herbs
1 clove garlic, minced
2 Tbsp red onion, chopped
½ chopped tart apple

Wash and dry toast quinoa, and place in a pot with 2 cups water. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer and cover for 10 minutes until quinoa is dry and fully cooked. Chop nuts and dry toast in a pan. Combine oil, lime juice and zest, sea salt, garlic, and herbs, and mix until well combined. Mix nuts, dressing, onion and apple into cooked quinoa and serve.
Serves 4