Tag Archives: Inflammation

IgG Food Sensitivity Testing and Reducing Inflammation

Food Antibody testing is one of my favorite tools for helping patients take charge of their own health, especially if there is a chronic inflammatory concern such as eczema, joint pain, digestive upset, or even mental agitation. Virtually all chronic disease has an underlying inflammatory component–that is, any long-term health issue, regardless of what system of the body it effects, is the result of ongoing inflammation.

So what is inflammation?  

It is the natural process the body uses to repair damage to the system and get rid of organisms that make us sick.  When an infectious agent such as a virus or bacteria enter the body, our immune system will recognize that foreign agent and attack it.  White blood cells are our immune cells that mount this attack. Specialized white blood cells will make a “flag”, called an antibody, that recognize certain proteins as foreign.  When they recognize a protein, those antibodies will attach themselves to those proteins (that often are part of a virus or bacteria) and signal the rest of the immune system to eradicate it.  Other white blood cells will engulf the protein, digest it, and then spit out the remains of that protein to be eliminated by the lymph system. This process produces inflammation, which we experience as redness, swelling, heat, and the production of mucus.  

How does this relate to foods?  

Well, in some cases, the body will recognize other proteins that come into the system as foreign.  This can include things like pollen, cat dander, mold spores, or proteins in foods. The body will mount a similar type of attack as described above on these proteins in the body even though they aren’t necessarily pathogens (bugs that will make us sick).  Instead, we call them allergens. If we are continually exposed to these allergens, the body will chronically produce inflammation. While a food may not be the agent that initially triggered the inflammatory response, the body may continue to have an inflammatory response if the food is eaten regularly.  Although foods may not be the only cause of chronic inflammation, they are one factor that can easily be changed without medication that can make a great impact on reducing the inflammatory response.

So what is IgG testing?  

IgG is a type of antibody–the “flags” the body uses to tell the immune system to make inflammation in a specific place.  Our body makes a range of types of antibodies that all do something slightly different. For instance, IgE antibodies are associated with immediate sensitivity reactions–if you know anyone allergic to peanuts or shellfish, for example, you may have seen that type of immediate reaction where the body reacts right away. IgG is a delayed antibody that may take several hours or even a couple of days to react, so it can be quite difficult to pick it out which food is causing the inflammatory response.  For this reason, a delayed food sensitivity can manifest as some of the more ongoing types of reactions, such as joint pain, IBS, eczema, chronic sinus issues, asthma, autoimmune thyroid disease, and even chronic mental agitation. Of course, we can eliminate and reintroduce foods to our diet without any testing, but elimination diets can be laborious and confusing. When we test first, it gives us an idea of the best foods to eliminate first instead of choosing blindly.  Several clinical trials in recent years have found that using IgG testing to guide food elimination can have a positive impact on many chronic issues, including inflammatory bowel disease, eczema, and migraine headaches.

Once I find out which foods I’m reacting to, what do I do?  

This is my favorite part, because it allows us to be scientists with our own bodies.  In a nutshell, the scientific method involves taking a system, changing something within the system, and observing the changes. When we actively change the diet, and pay attention to what happens, we do a little scientific experiment on ourselves that gives us the power to decide how we are going to feel each day based on the decisions we make.  When we do a food elimination, I like for you to eliminate all the potential offending foods that may be causing inflammation in your body. We give your body a few weeks–usually 4 to 6 weeks–to help the system come to a more neutral state. At this point, you note how you feel without all of those foods.

How Do I Reintroduce Foods? 

Once you have eliminated foods for an appropriate amount of time, we will  start to reintroduce foods one at a time. You will find that one of three things happens: 1. You take away a food, feel no different, then add it back, and feel no different.  2. You take a away a food, feel better, then add it back and feel obviously worse. Or 3. Somewhere in the middle–you take away a food, feel better, then you can add it back in a dose-dependent fashion and feel ok. (for example–you can tolerate eggs in baked goods but don’t feel well when you eat scrambled eggs for breakfast). When you reintroduce a food and find it bothers you, I recommend continuing to stay off of that food for at least 6 months.  For some people, a food intolerance will last for life, but for some, if the body becomes healthier and more robust overall they will be able to successfully reintroduce foods.

The knowledge you gain from eliminating and reintroducing foods helps develop what I view as the most powerful tool you have to maintain your health:  self awareness. The more aware we are, the more powerfully we can act. When we understand how our actions influence our overall state of health, we gain the ability to work as our own doctors.

Thank you for letting me be a part of your health journey!

 

Zar S1, Mincher L, Benson MJ, Kumar D. Food-specific IgG4 antibody-guided exclusion diet improves symptoms and rectal compliance in irritable bowel syndrome.Scand J Gastroenterol. 2005 Jul;40(7):800-7.

Aydinlar EI1, Dikmen PY, Tiftikci A, et al.  IgG-based elimination diet in migraine plus irritable bowel syndrome. Headache. 2013 Mar;53(3):514-25.

Alpay K1, Ertas M, Orhan EK, et al. Diet restriction in migraine, based on IgG against foods: a clinical double-blind, randomised, cross-over trial. Cephalalgia. 2010 Jul;30(7):829-37.

Mitchell N1, Hewitt CE, Jayakody S, et al.  Randomised controlled trial of food elimination diet based on IgG antibodies for the prevention of migraine like headaches. Nutr J. 2011 Aug 11

Liu Y1, Yan H2, Shao F3,et al. Correlation between childhood eczema and specific IgG antibody level. J Biol Regul Homeost Agents. 2018 Mar-Apr;32(2):341-344.

 

Holistic Approaches to Inflammation and Chronic Disease

An Introduction to Chronic Inflammation

In many chronic disease states, inflammation is a common underlying factor.  If you are suffering from something that ends with “itis” (arthritis, tendinitis, pancreatitis, diverticulitis, etc), this is a medical term for “that part of your body has inflammation”. So what is inflammation?  On the large scale, we look for heat, redness, pain, and swelling; these are all key factors that tell us inflammation is taking place. Microscopically, we see that blood vessels become more permeable and extra fluid and immune cells come to the area to protect and heal the body and remove waste from the area.

What is the purpose of inflammation?  It is your body’s natural defense system: this is how your body protects and heals itself in cases of infection, allergy, and injury. When a foreign organism such as a bacteria, virus or fungus enters the body, your immune system launches a highly sophisticated attack to kill the invader and then clean up the remains of the battle afterwards.

While inflammation is a very important and appropriate action for the body to take, when it pops up in inappropriate places or continues on beyond the normal course of infection or injury it causes chronic pain and damage to that part of the body.

Chronic inflammation is the underlying cause of many very common chronic diseases.  Cardiovascular disease, arthritis, asthma, autoimmune thyroid disease, IBS and other digestive disorders, and eczema are all cases of chronic inflammation. When inflammation becomes chronic the area will be in a state of simultaneous destruction and healing, which over time can lead to scarring and loss of function.

Conventional treatment for inappropriate inflammation primarily relies on four types of drugs, all of which act by suppressing a key component of the body’s inflammatory response: Steroids such as prednisone mimic your body’s stress hormones’ ability to suppress inflammation.  Nonsteroidal antiinflammatories such as ibuprofen and acetomenophen suppress an enzyme called cyclooxygenase that creates the mediators that cause inflammation in the body.  Biologic drugs such as embrel and humira block the action of another inflammation-causing protein called Tissue Necrosis Factor. For more allergic sypmtoms, antihistamines such as Allegra suppress the release of histamine from allergic cells.  Although the effects of all of these drugs have different effects and can be quite useful to control symptoms in the short term, what they all have in common is that they suppress our body’s natural reaction to an underlying issue and can have significant unwanted side effects.  

There are a few primary concerns regarding the use of conventional medications for reducing inflammation. In the case of steroids and biologic drugs, they can suppress your immunity, leading to unwanted infection that can be difficult to treat.  NSAIDs can damage the liver, gut and kidney.  Antihistamines impact the nervous system and can cause drowsiness, hyperactivity, a decrease in secretions to the eyes, nose and mouth, and difficulty in urination. Rather than suppressing natural function, the goal with natural treatments is to divert the body’s innate function towards anti-inflammatory pathways.

Natural options for minimizing inflammation

There are three key elements to minimize inflammation holistically:  Exercise, Diet, and Supplements.  If you feel good now and want to minimize inflammation in the long-term, diet and exercise are a great place to start.  If you are already in a position where inflammation is a concern for you, botanicals and supplements may be necessary to get things under control.

Exercise:  While in the short-term exercise can trigger an acute inflammatory reaction, research has shown a long-term moderate training regimen decreases the body’s production of inflammatory cytokines.  The inflammation that is caused by working out is important for remodeling and building muscle mass.  In fact, post-workout treatments such as ibuprofen and icing the area have been shown to decrease the body’s ability to build muscle mass.  As the initial inflammation post-workout decreases, though,  It is important to keep in mind, however, that repetitive exercise that pushes the muscles past their capacity, such as long-distance running and body building, cause short-term inflammation (aka, delayed soreness after working out) that over time causes scarring damage to the muscle fibers.

Diet:  There are three basic components to reducing inflammation in the diet:  Eat more antiinflammatory foods, eat fewer pro-inflammatory foods, and avoid allergens or sensitivities.

Antiinflammatory Foods are those that support healthy digestion and improved liver function help the body rid itself of wastes that can trigger inflammation.  These include high fiber foods such as leafy greens, broccoli, and carrots, foods high in soluble fiber such as apples, flax, pears, and chia, foods high in omega-3 fats such as fish and flax, liver support foods such as beets, cucumbers, and greens, and probiotic foods such as kefir, yogurt, natural sauerkraut and pickles, miso, and kombucha.

Pro-Inflammatory Foods encourage the formation of pro-inflammatory cytokines.  While meats can be beneficial for other reasons, they are good to consume in moderation because their fat content can create more inflammation.  Refined carbohydrates in white flours and sugar can cause inflammation in the digestion; they also spike the blood sugar, which in turn can cause the formation of excess triglycerides which then causes inflammation in the blood vessels and can lead to cardiovascular disease and diabetes.  Alcohol depresses the ability of the liver to move toxins from the body which can create more inflammation and also spikes the blood sugar.

Finally, food allergens or sensitivities can compromise the integrity of the lining of the digestive tract, which allows larger particles of foods to enter the bloodstream, which in turn can cause the body to have an immune reaction to those particles.  One particularly good example of this is the association between celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease.  The most common food sensitivites tend to be dairy, gluten, egg, and soy, but the body can react to any food; testing or elimination diets can be useful to help sort this out.

Omega-3 fatty acids:  These fats have gotten a lot of press in the past 15 years because of their remarkable ability to decrease inflammation and improve the texture and quality of the skin and mucus membranes.  Omega-3 fats divert the biochemical pathway that normally creates inflammatory cytokines to a pathway that creates anti-inflammatory mediators.  There are several good sources of Omega-3 fats on the market today: generally, our bodies are able to use animal derived sources (such as those found in fish)  more readily than vegetarian sources (such as flax or borage seed).  While krill oil has recently become quite popular as a supplement, I do not recommend it because I have been hearing reports that krill populations are becoming threatened due to overharvesting: I prefer to leave them for the whales.

Botanicals and Supplements:  There are a number of plant medicines available that are quite useful for decreasing inflammation.  These include curcumin, derived from the turmeric plant, quercetin, derived from onions, and boswellia, or frankincense.  Supplements such as deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL) and L-glutamine can help restore the integrity of the digestive tract.  There are also a number of proteolytic enzyme products on the market that can be useful for decreasing scar tissue that can form during times of chronic inflammation, which will decrease pain and increase the ability of the area to heal.

 

Decrease Inflammation and Improve Digestion with Sprouts!

When I lived in Alaska, I had a patient who was a Slow Food diva.  Not only did she bake all her breads from scratch, she started from whole grains, then sprouted them, low-temperature oven dried them, and ground them into flour before turning them into delicious treats. Even though we all can’t be this dedicated to our food all the time, there is real value to putting this type of intention into nourishing our family.  Especially during these first weeks of spring, I can’t think of anything more appropriate or seasonal to eat than sprouted foods.  So in honor of all the teeny radish sprouts poking up in my garden, let’s talk about the health benefits of sprouts.

So, why is it worthwhile to eat sprouted foods?  Two of the primary goals for our eating during the spring are to improve digestion and absorption of food and decrease inflammation in the body.  Sprouts and sprouted foods are a wonderful way to work towards all of these goals.  This is both because of how foods are transformed during sprouting as well as the health benefits of the sprouts themselves

To read the rest of this article on Dr Rosen’s Grigel’s blog, click here

Listening to Our Bodies–Testing for Food Sensitivities

As I have mentioned before, one of the most profoundly satisfying parts of my job is watching people make choices that result in better health. Each of us is truly our own best doctor, but sometimes it can be quite confusing to figure out what signals to listen to. For example, often one part of our brain is telling us “I need coffee and cookies! Get them now and eat them all!” and another part of our brain may be saying “mmm…perhaps not.” One of these voices tends to be much louder, though and can make it difficult to ultimately make good choices.

Sometimes in order to really understand how our bodies respond to how we treat them it is helpful to take a break from our normal routines. There are many ways to do this, and frequently it involves dietary change. In my practice, I frequently will do blood testing for food sensitivities–when we get the information back, we will take the elevated foods out of the diet for 4-6 weeks. Generally, people will feel much better during this time–we frequently see a reduction in many symptoms including joint pain, skin problems, fatigue, allergies, and digestive complaints. However, one of the best parts of doing this, I have found, is the amazing sense of self awareness that people develop around what goes into their bodies. When they start adding foods back, I will often hear comments about how different foods produce different sensations in the body. This increased understanding makes it infinitely easier to make good choices because it becomes so clear how good we feel when we eat what is good for us. Additionally, we become that much more powerful as our own doctors because we know how to choose to feel good.